Picture Perfect Anatolia- Miniaturk Journey Continues


dAY 3: 12th April

Alright so we are back to Miniaturk, the park where every Turkish Monument is replicated for everyone to see.

 Q: How will you know which monument is in front of you and what it represents?

 A: (Ref Photo 9) The black box in the photo depicts an info box. On the Miniaturk ticket there is a bar code. A red beam catches the code and there is an audio that tells the person about the monument. This infomedia is available in English, Turkish, German and i guess a host of other languages.

Now a mention of some of the monuments which belong to the Anatolian region

??? What is Anatolia?

Anatolia also Asia Minor, is a geographic and historical term denoting the westernmost protrusion of Asia, comprising the majority of the Republic of Turkey. The region is bounded by the Black Sea to the north, Georgia to the northeast, the Armenian Highland to the east, Mesopotamia to the southeast, the Mediterranean Sea to the south and the Aegean Sea to the west. Anatolia has been home to many civilizations throughout history, such as the Hittites, Phrygians, Lydians, Persians, Greeks, Assyrians, Armenians, Romans, Georgians, Anatolian Seljuks and Ottomans. As a result, Anatolia has been of interest to archaeologists.

Alright i’ll skim the gyaaani kisse and bring on some famous monuments 😀 😀

Amasya’s Yalıboyu Houses: (Photos 3 and 4)

These houses on the banks of Yeşilırmak River in Amasya were built at the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. One of their most noteworthy features is that they were the first prefabricated houses in Anatolia. Indeed, some of them were put up within as little as one day. These houses in Amasya are fine examples of Anatolian Turkish civilian architecture.

The thing to notice is the detail with which the houses have been constructed. Also notice the 2 kids riding a bike and the detail. (=To be mentioned a lot henceforth!!!)

Mount Nemrut Ruins: (Photo 17 and 18)

Remains of the Commagene Kingdom are to found at an altitude of 2206 meters on Mount Nemrut near the town of Kahta in Adıyaman. Dating back to 80 B.C. – 72 A.D., these ruins are referred to as the 8th wonder of the world. On the eastern side of the open-air temple on Mount Nemrut are eight scuptured statues of gods, measuring in length from 8-10 meters, placed on wooden pedestals. These ancient remains were rediscovered by a German engineer in 1881. The site which was restored in 1984 was declared a National Heritage.

Again supreme attention to the detail. wonderfully done.

There are an incredibly large number of monuments,  mosques and artefacts in the Anatolian region and places like Ankara (=BTW the capital of Turkey!!), Izmir, Bursa, Edirne etc.

The other thing i want to talk about is Pamukkale. (=For those who the name doesn’t ring a bell, Pamukkale is the site where Ranbir Kapoor’s song Tu Jaane Na  was shot.)

Pamukkalai

meaning “cotton castle” in Turkish, is a natural site in Denizli Province in southwestern Turkey. The city contains hot springs and travertines, terraces of carbonate minerals left by the flowing water.

These naturally formed white chalk (travertine) terraces near Denizli are unique in the world. The series of cascaded pools are formed as a spring at 35°C with a high content of dissolved calcium bubbles up and leaves deposits behind it. It is known as Pamukkale, literally cotton castles. It is said that the water that flows through these is good for heart patients (=Not Medically proven, locally accepted)

We were stunned at this display. The amount of editing i’ve had to do is a testimony to Turkey’s rich heritage and the efforts put into this display..!!!! MUST SEE!!!

The next section deals with Greek Monuments scattered around Turkey which have fallen into ruins but have been reconstructed for everyone to see.

Coming Up: A Grecian Urn..Monuments by the Dozen

 

Ziraat Bankasi, Ankara

 

Ishak Pasha Sarayi

 

Stone Houses in Mardin

 

Detail Man!!

 

Bursa’s Ulu Camii (Great Mosque)

 

 

First Turkish War Boat

 

Seamen

 

Ankara’s War Monument

 

 

INFO Dibba

 

The Railway Line

 

A Cable Car

 

Exquisite

 

Precision and Accuracy

 

 

OMG

 

Mount Nemrut Ruins

 

Attention to the Detail

 

Erzurum’s Double-Minareted Medrese

8 Gods at Mount Nemrut

 

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Move Over Beckenscot…Miniatürk is Here..and How!!


Day 3: 12th April 

After the morning chow at Golden Horn (=Same old same old…Meze, yoghurt and eggs with the usual bread with preserves), we decided that on the agenda today was “Miniatürk” 

This place happens to be a little into the Istanbul suburbs (=On the European side of Turkey though) so we had to cab it. We had the reception ask for a cab and drove off along with our armour of woolens and jackets. The Cab driver was a quiet sullen one actually, (=We’re really used to cheery cab guys and pick up persons because we chat a lot with them) and it seemed as he resented driving us till there.

 

Driving through the Istanbul suburbs didn’t present a postcard version of the city. Of course the landscapes and the water along the road made it scenic but the houses were tumbledown and looked a little old.

Houses here are like the ones in the photo..but these houses were a little old, wore signs of occupation for years and had clothes hanging outside..also it was a little congested with a lot of houses packed together.

 

But I don’t mean congestion in the Indian way keeping Mumbai in mind…there were adequate open spaces and trees with beautiful tulips planted. It was a sight to watch but not as beautiful as the buildings are in the Historical Peninsula, the place where we were staying.

Right back to Miniatürk..

 

Miniatürk covers a total area of 60,000 square meters. Its model area is 15,000 sqm, making Miniaturk the world’s largest miniature park in respect to its model area. Miniaturk also boasts 40,000 sqm of open space, 3,500 sqm of covered area, 2,000 sqm of pools and waterways, and a parking lot with a capacity of 500 vehicles.     

 

The park contains 120 models done in 1/25th scale. 57 of the structures are from Istanbul, 51 are from Anatolia, and 12 are from the Ottoman territories that today lie outside of Turkey. Additional space was reserved for potential future models. The infrastructure was built taking into consideration the needs of potential additions. Therefore, Miniaturk will continue growing, modeling, in a sense, planned urbanization.

 

The park hosts icons of many cultures and civilizations. Models vary from the Hagia Sophia to Selimiye, from Rumeli Fortress to Galata Tower, from Safranbolu Houses to the Sumela Monastry, from Qubbat As-Sakhrah to the ruins of Mount Nemrut. In addition, some works that have not survived into the present, such as the Temple of Artemis, the Halicarnassus Mausoleum and Ajyad Castle, were recreated.

 

Special attention was paid to include every civilization that ruled in and around Anatolia and left their marks. Miniaturk traces a 3000-year history from Antiquity to Byzantium, from Seljuks to the Ottoman Empire and into the present day.

 

Aiming to create a fairy tale atmosphere, the Miniaturk project is divided into three main sections. The sections are Anatolia, Istanbul and the former Ottoman territories. The sections are separated from one another by small landscape designs that ensure continuity by guiding visitors throughout their visit.

(=Ok Enough Gyan!!)

 

Miniaturk is a vast expanse of land which has been very well planned. Also it shows a glimpse of Turkey (=Rightlu summed up as Turkey on My Plate), you do get a rush tour of Turkey as a country and its shift through the times.

This is an excellent place to bring children and make them proud of their heritage. Like I said, it’s a MASTERPIECE.

This keeps monuments and history alive even though the actual may not be in a good condition. And there are no two ways about it, this is a place that has GOT TO BE VISITED.

So we got in after taking an entry pass, and saw about 2-3 groups of school students being led by their teachers to this park. I’m sure if i was someone who went to a school in Istanbul, I’d insist on being taken here.

Now the park is divided into 3 areas,

  1. Anatolia
  2. Istanbul
  3. Turkish/Ottoman Monuments outside Türkiye

I’m going to elaborate about these 3 sections separately so that I do it justice.

But what we did find here is the committed efforts of the Management to make sure that these Representatives are kept in proper condition and are regularly cleaned. Also that repairs are made as and when necessary in phases so that one section of the park is always being maintained. (=A pretty good way of making sure the entire park is functional).

There were people scrubbing these Reps with water and a brush. There was even a provision for drainage of water that’s on top of the monument so that water does not accumulate. You just have to appreciate the amount of effort that has been put into making these Representative Models and in taking care of them.

 

Don’t worry about this being boring and just being models on display. Your ticket to Miniatürk has a barcode that will be read by an instrument in front of the model which will give out some information about the Representative Model in either Türkish or English. That is decided by the barcode and the ticket (=You’re supposed to specify that you prefer English at the Gate!! I think other languages are also available like German but i’m not certain)

 

There is also a restaurant on the premises that serves good food (=Unlimited bread here as well!!) We did take a lunch break half way into the Anatolian region and ordered some Pizza, Soup, Pasta and a Curry. One was a Meal Special. And they don’t make their pasta from scratch its a thawed one on your plate for all the anti-frozen brigade. But the food is good and reasonable.

Along with Miniatürk, there is also a Victory Muzesii & Crystal Muzesii (=Muzessi-Museum).

The Victory Museum is dedicated to the Turkish war of Independence. During the First World War, Turkey fought with Germany and also overthrew the Caliphate to be established as a Republic on October 29th, 1923 led by Mustafa Kemal Pasha Atatürk.

The Crystal Museum is a place where a few famous landmarks of Turkey are showcased in crystal using light and special display.

So as you can see, Miniatürk is a fascinating place to visit if you’re cut short of time.

But DO spend your time slowly savouring the Representatives and appreciating the history. Also the Representatives are very realistically done with beautiful carvings replicated. Take your time with your camera and have a snack to keep your power going.

Coming Up: Anatolian Region, Istanbul, Victory Museum, Crystal Museum

Stay Tuned

Oh Wait…I forgot about the suicidal lizard. There are train tracks running through the entire park (=I didn’t see the train though) So at one place in the section for Ottoman Monuments out of Turkey, there was a lizard near the tracks, Maybe he wanted to get on the train, maybe he was suicidal..Point is, his wish remained unfulfilled. .. 😀 😀

Istanbul Suburbs (Rep pic only)

 

 

 

Airport being cleaned

 

Camera Shy

 

Mustafa Kemal Pasha Ataturk

 

Miniaturk

Panorama 1

Trick photography

Expansive

Keeping it clean

Conservation

Guardian of the Mini-Monument

Conservation Workers

Cleaning in Progress

A suicidal lizard

No Luck!!

Miniaturk